Skip to Content

Get a FREE assessment of your rental property. Start here!

Get a FREE assessment of your rental property. Start here!

Fire Danger and Rental Property Owners

Fire Danger and Rental Property Owners

Fire always remains a real danger for rental property owners because of its ability to spread fast and raze through virtually anything within its path in mere minutes. The National Fire Protection released a report which shows that cook fires remain the leading cause of home structure fires in the U.S.

The findings also highlight that home fire injuries and smoking materials continue to be the leading cause of home fires. One-quarter of home fire deaths resulted from fires that originated in the Fire Danger and Rental Property Ownersbedroom, 24% from fires in the family room, living room or den, and 15% from fires starting from the kitchen.

These fire statistics reminds us that fire is still a deadly threat and we must do more to prevent fires from occurring in our properties. The rule of the thumb is to install and maintain fire protection devices, such as fire alarms, residential fire sprinklers and smoke detectors as a preventive measure.

Here are fire safety tips to follow.

  • Watch your cooking – Stay in the kitchen when you are frying, grilling or broiling food. Never leave food unattended even if you must leave for a short time.
  • Space heaters- Keep fixed and portable space heaters at least three feet from flammable objects. Turn off the heaters when you leave the room or go to sleep.
  • Smoke outside – Ensure smokers smoke outside the house. If possible, set up sturdy or deep ashtrays for smokers.
  • Matches and lighters – Keep matches and lighters up high or out of reach of children.
  • Candles- When using candles, make sure to keep them one foot from anything than burn quickly. Blow out candle when you leave the room or go to sleep.
  • Electrical cords – inspect your electrical cords for faults or loose connections. Replace cords that are cracked, damaged, naked, or have broken plugs.
  • Smoke alarms – Test smoke alarms at least once a month and replace conventional batteries once a year. Replace any smoke alarm that is more than 10 years old.

We are pledged to the letter and spirit of U.S. policy for the achievement of equal housing opportunity throughout the Nation. See Equal Housing Opportunity Statement for more information.